Design Thinking Journal

 

The design thinking process can be used to encourage problem-solving, critical thinking, and collaboration among students and can be incorporated into various subjects and projects, across different disciplines. It is used where a need or opportunity is identified and a design solution is developed. As an example, students could create solutions to reduce waste at their school which promotes sustainability.

 

The Steps in the Design Thinking Process

It is a non-linear process which can boost creativity and innovation in your students. This journal has utilises 5 steps which is the model proposed by Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford: Empathise, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test.

The journal can be adapted to suit the particular need of the project, whilst building skill in using technology creatively.

For more information on the process, please see here: https://web.stanford.edu/~mshanks/MichaelShanks/files/509554.pdf

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Posted on May 28, 2023

This is a wonderful design thinking journal - thorough, and colorful! I love this process for getting students involved in problem solving and critical thinking.

Our district has been to the d school at Stanford and participated in this process. I love how you have taken the process and provided a journal to guide learners. The “add audio” place marks are a fantastic touch!

Posted on May 28, 2023

Thank you so much, Cheryl! Wow, you have even been to the d school? Sign me up! It's such a deep thinking process!

Posted on May 28, 2023

What a beautiful design thinking journal that scaffolds students through this process. I teach preservice teachers about using design thinking in their future classrooms, and this journal is a wonderful example of how we can support and extend student creativity and thinking.

Thanks for sharing!

Posted on May 28, 2023

Hi Jessica, Thanks so much! That's so good to hear that preservice teachers are across this. Well done!

Posted on May 28, 2023

Beautifully designed, very simple to follow and full of all the important considerations for bringing DT to the classroom. Five stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Posted on June 02, 2023

High praise indeed! Thank you so much. It's a great process...

Posted on May 29, 2023

Brilliant. I love the simplicity of the scaffold and the creativity that you model in its creation. Design thinking is a great way to learn by exploring real world problems. Creating solutions to local problems is just a start. Setting your students up to solve problems of the world in future. Thanks for sharing. 😊


Posted on June 02, 2023

Julie, thanks so much! The process allows for such deep thinking - it's a real 'work in progress' to develop skill in problem solving!

Posted on May 30, 2023

Fantastic work. Such a great resource. Thank you for sharing.

Posted on June 02, 2023

Thanks so much, P. See you soon on the Gold Coast 😂

Posted on May 31, 2023

I appreciate the additional of the REFLECTION step. It's so valuable for students to reflect on their growth and learning.

Posted on June 02, 2023

Thanks so much, Suzanne. It's a critical step and something I want to prioritise!

Posted on May 31, 2023

I love this! I am going to try to use this in a collaborative innovation class in the fall!

Posted on June 02, 2023

Thank you, Lori. That's great news! Please let me know how it goes!

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